Obituary: Ian Fredericks

A leading Australian figure in the area of electronic and multi-media music, Ian Fredericks died in March this year. Performance artists Tess De Quincey and Stuart Lynch worked with Ian on a number of projects. De Quincey recently dedicated her eloquent Nerve 9 performance to Fredericks while Stuart Lynch, currently working in Europe, sent the following, an excerpt from a personal obituary:

“The day I met Ian I had the most extraordinary dance experience of my life. It was in February 1997 and within an hour of us being introduced I had heard and danced to Requiem for a Planet. Until that moment I had always doubted dance. At the age of 20 I broke both my legs in a motorcycle crash and 3 years later I changed careers for dance. This was deemed ludicrous by my doctors, considered a result of some latent madness, or the inherent inability to make right choices. I persisted dancing all through the 1990s, always accompanied by doubt. The exception was when I was dancing that first time to his compositions. Then, I had no doubt about dance and its potential. Then, I was clear about its beauty and godly grace. Then, both of us were in tears. Be sure, that in the music of Ian Fredericks, one hears the voice, and love of God.”

RealTime issue #43 June-July 2001 pg. 8

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1 June 2001