Featured Artist: Michael Riley

RealTime

Michae Riley, Cloud 2000 (detail), inkjet print, 125 x 86cm

Michae Riley, Cloud 2000 (detail), inkjet print, 125 x 86cm

Michael Riley (Wiradjuri/Gamilaroi people) is one of the most idiosyncratic and inventive of contemporary artists. He explores Indigenous issues in non-literal ways, working through curious juxtapositions that make us look at the Australian psychic landscape in new ways. Riley’s distinctive body of photographic and film works will be celebrated at the fourth Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at Queensland Art Gallery opening in September.

Asia Pacific Triennial 2002 focuses on a number of artists who have made significant contributions to the contemporary arts internationally since the 1960s and each will be represented with a comprehensive group of works. Says gallery director Doug Hall, “The exhibition creates a context in which we see works by these senior artists, alongside artworks dealing with similar ideas and themes by other regionally significant, but lesser known artists.”

Artists to be represented are: Montien Boonma (Thailand), Eugene Carchesio (Australia), Heri Dono (Indonesia), Joan Grounds (USA/Australia), Ralph Hotere (Aotearoa New Zealand), Yayoi Kusama (Japan), Lee U-fan (South Korea/Japan), Jose Legaspi (Philippines), Michael Ming Hong Lin (Taiwan), Nalini Malani (India), Nam June Paik (South Korea/USA), ‘Pasifika Divas’ (Pacific Islands and Aotearoa New Zealand), Lisa Reihana (Aotearoa New Zealand) Michael Riley (Australia), Song Dong (China), Suh Do-Ho (South Korea/USA) and Howard Taylor (Australia).

Hall comments “The selection of artists reflects key themes, including the impact of the moving image on the visual culture in the 20th century, the persistence of performance as a key form of cultural expression in contemporary art, and the capacity of contemporary art to explore the complexities of globalisation.”

RealTime issue #50 Aug-Sept 2002 pg. 13

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1 August 2002