editorial rt79

Jonathan Dady, Cardboard Pianos, installation, <BR />There Forever, Port Adelaide”></p>
<p class=Jonathan Dady, Cardboard Pianos, installation,
There Forever, Port Adelaide

What are the markers of this great age of hybridity? In the arts they are transience, transformation and sensory transport in works that heighten our sense of ephemerality, of mutability and, with apparent magic [digital and otherwise], shake loose our perceptual certainties. In There Forever, Jonathan Dady’s cardboard pianos exhibited in a deserted shop in Port Adelaide [page 4-5] evoke the fragile, even surreal aspirations embodied in the incipient regeneration of an old suburb. In Merilyn Fairskye’s video work Stati di Animo [p3], past and present likewise co-exist in the moment, in a dynamic of stillness and motion—the photographic fixity of waiting airline passengers juxtaposed with the ghostly brushstrokes of those on the move. In Aqua [cover image], Fairskye’s new work for Stills Gallery, the video image of a swimmer is layered some 50 times, each image a second apart, generating an intensely fluid impressionism—‘now’ and ‘then’ constantly folding into each other. Whether in the works of Dady and Fairskye or in Jia Zhang-Ke’s feature film, Still Life [p17], where we are invited to look in real time rather than surrender again to the edit, or in Craigie Horsfield’s enigmatic “slow time” photography [p41], or in Chris Marker’s Owls at Noon [p27], or in the Wooster Group’s replay and recreation of Richard Burton’s 1954 made-for-television Hamlet, it is above all our sense of time, perceived visually, aurally, spatially and filtered through many media, that is radically undone.  Jonathan Dady, Cardboard Pianos, installation, <BR />There Forever, Port Adelaide”></p>
<p class= Jonathan Dady, Cardboard Pianos, installation,
There Forever, Port Adelaide

RealTime issue #79 June-July 2007 pg. 1

© Keith Gallasch; for permission to reproduce apply to realtime@realtimearts.net

1 June 2007