editorial – rt108

Nikki Jones and audience 
member, Ush and Them, Proximity 
Micro Festival of One-on-One Art

Nikki Jones and audience
member, Ush and Them, Proximity
Micro Festival of One-on-One Art

Nikki Jones and audience
member, Ush and Them, Proximity
Micro Festival of One-on-One Art

There’s a lot of walking in RealTime 108. Good exercise for mind and body. Matthew Lorenzon goes on an art walk in Battambang, Cambodia, exploring the city’s artistic re-emergence. Next Wave director Emily Sexton talks about the communality of sharing with fellow walkers one’s responses to a range of selected festival works on day-long guided walks. At the end of an intense NOW Now concert, Romy Caen goes on a programmed hour-long night walk in silence, alerted to the sound world of Sydney’s Marrickville. Ian Millis writes about a Green Bans walk through Sydney’s Woolloomooloo, meeting people who were there in the 70s and recalling the fusion of art and activism that saved significant parts of the city from development. Millis argues for the walk as art: ephemeral, collaborative, memorial, political. From there, it’s a mere step into a virtual world of public transport, and public violence, realised in Van Sowerwine and Isobel Knowles’ latest interactive creation, It’s a jungle in here, where fellow travellers might irritate or turn nasty and you choose how to respond. Elsewhere, a sometimes amused, sometimes perturbed Laetitia Wilson reports you can find yourself seriously on your own, up close and very personal with an artist in a one-on-one live art work. One of which was Ush and Them with Nikki Jones (pictured above) corralling a bemused viewer in her work about ushers and guides. As this edition of RealTime extensively reports, together, alone, engaged with the actual or the virtual, the art experience is exponentially expanding.

RealTime issue #108 April-May 2012 pg. 2

© Keith Gallasch; for permission to reproduce apply to realtime@realtimearts.net

10 April 2012