Editorial 23 August 2017

After focusing on graduate and postgraduate artists in recent weeks in our ongoing Arts Education & Training Feature, we turn our attention to new works made by academics who are prominent artists, successfully practising from within and beyond the academy.

23 August 2017

OzAsia & Hong Kong: Identity & connection

Chris Reid

Chris Reid speaks with OzAsia participating choreographer Chloe Wong and Hong Kong Arts Development Council Chairman Dr Wilfred Wong Ying Wai about art and the autonomous territory’s cultural identity.

23 August 2017

Hir: A family revolution

Keith Gallasch

Laughter and subtle characterisations abound in American playwright Taylor Mac’s riotously funny and wrenchingly serious comedy-drama Hir, about a working class family radically transformed by a transgender adolescent.

23 August 2017

Woman with an Editing Bench: How do film editors think?

Lauren Carroll Harris

Made at Macquarie University, Dr Karen Pearlman’s new film about Elizaveta Svilova, editor of Man with a Movie Camera, is both a stand-alone art work and original research into editing and distributed cognition.

23 August 2017

Sono-musical languages

Tristan Louth-Robins & Ben Brooker

In revealing performances, Adelaide’s Soundstream Collective played works for traditional instruments and electronics by Cat Hope, Alvin Curran, Erkki Veltheim, Elena Kats Chernin and Leah Blankendaal.

23 August 2017

Speechless: Giving voice to refugees

Chris Reid

Composed in response to the inadequate reception for The Forgotten Children report, Speechless, a new opera by Monash University Professor of Music Cat Hope, brings together soloists, unusual instrumentation and a community choir.

23 August 2017

Charlie Sofo: Split (2014)

Critical Video

Like a slide show, a stream of photographs of adjoining domestic façades reveals everyday artistic tendencies and something darker in the artist’s appreciation of the local, writes Emily Stewart.

23 August 2017

The Rape of Lucretia, put to the test

Keith Gallasch

With superb musicianship, striking design and challenges for its actor-singers, Sydney Chamber Opera’s provocative take on Benjamin Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia tests the work’s moral and gender framework.

23 August 2017

VR at MIFF: A World Apart

Dan Edwards

Dan Edwards wonders if “perhaps VR is the quintessential representational technology of our time: disorientating, self-centred, exciting, world-changing — and rife with dissociative potential.”

23 August 2017

Making the most of end time

Victoria Carless

In The Danger Ensemble’s very timely The Hamlet Apocalypse, actors oscillate between playing themselves and Shakespeare’s characters with verve as the world goes to pieces, writes Victoria Carless.

23 August 2017

Dancenorth & Urab Dancers: Power shifts

Bernadette Ashley

In Tectonic, Dancenorth stages a work about power and climate change juxtaposed with a performance by the Urab Dancers from the slowly sinking Torres Strait island of Poruma.

23 August 2017

The Loop

Public art feeding into fake history, new critical voices on film emerging from MIFF and words that sound like the future: three vital art reads.

23 August 2017

Editorial 16 August 2017

This week in our Arts Education & Training Feature we take you into the postgraduate screen-world with an in-depth look at the Australian Film Television and Radio School’s new Masters Degree programs.

16 August 2017

Top of the Lake: China Girl: Beauty concealing violence

Eloise Ross

With its feminist focus on a dynamic group of women, the new season of Top of the Lake takes Eloise Ross beneath Sydney’s shiny exterior into a murky world of sex workers, illegal surrogacy and missing girls.

16 August 2017

AFTRS: Postgrad research as practice

Keith Gallasch

MA Screen Course Leader Nell Greenwood tells RealTime about AFTRS postgraduate programs that intimately and intensively challenge filmmakers to envision, reflect, develop new skills and make substantial works.

16 August 2017

The Derwent: Re-envisioning a river

Andrew Harper

A conglomerate of video art, IT creativity and archival materials, Martin Walch and David Stephenson’s The Derwent fascinates Andrew Harper with the immersive totality of its vision.

16 August 2017

Be Your Self and Trapper: Bodies of our time

John Bailey

John Bailey sees ADT’s “hugely physical” Be Your Self as “both intensely material and quietly abstracted,” while in Arena Theatre’s “visually lavish” Trapper, “the movement is slow and measured, conceptually proceeding with just as much deliberation.”

16 August 2017

Jack Symonds on Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia

Keith Gallasch

Jack Symonds reveals how SCO is radically addressing gender, religious and formal challenges in Benjamin Britten’s searing opera The Rape of Lucretia.

16 August 2017

Mountain in concert

Steve Dow

Steve Dow embraces the screen-stage synthesis of Jennifer Peedom’s spectacular mountain footage and the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s live score and ponders its potential for diversifying audiences.

16 August 2017

The Deep Archive: John O’Neill interviews Philip Brophy, 1994

John O’Neill

From The Deep Archive, in 1994 John O’Neill interviews an incisively funny Philip Brophy about the casting of his anti-realist feature film Body Melt with soapie, advertisement and cop show actors.

16 August 2017
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