Editorial, 13 December, 2017

Reality check. This is the last edition of RealTime. It’s been an extremely difficult and a very sad decision to make to draw the magazine to a close — to cease weekly publishing this year. In 2018, the magazine’s 25th year, we will complete the archiving of the deeply personal, totally consuming project that the magazine has been for us. It’ll be a year of reflection and celebration for RealTime’s many contributors, readers and supporters and, we hope, provide an enduring legacy — a unique record of a period in which the arts have radically transformed. You can read more about our decision here.

You’ll hear from us from time to time in 2018, but for now we wish you a much-needed, resuscitative holiday season and thank you for being part of our venture into art that makes a difference. Virginia & Keith

13 December 2017

MY MY MY: Amala Groom’s Have you seen MY Emily?

Keith Gallasch

In Have you seen MY Emily?, a wickedly amusing six-channel video installation, artist Amala Groom, performing multiple roles, recreates a tense conversation about cultural ownership with the wealthy owner of an Emily Kngwarreye painting.

12 December 2017

Giveaway: Raoul Peck, I Am Not Your Negro DVD

Unanimously praised by critics and audiences and now available on DVD from Madman Entertainment, Raoul Peck’s riveting documentary gives voice to the unfinished labours of US novelist and cultural observer James Baldwin.

12 December 2017

NORPA’s Djurra: Dreaming theatre

Vicki Van Hout

Vicki Van Hout travels to Lismore to see NORPA’s Djurra, a multidisciplinary production with deep cultural roots, physical theatre, musical and visual strengths and rich potential for script and performance development.

12 December 2017

A home for experimentation: new music in Adelaide

Chris Reid    

Chris Reid speaks with Stuart Johnson aka Wolfpanther, the curator of the Hotel Metropolitan’s Metro Experimental Night, who reveals a program rich in diverse genres in Adelaide’s developing new music scene.

12 December 2017

Editorial 6 December 2017

This week we’re foregrounding dance with reports from Cleo Mees and Nikki Heywood on the Interchange Festival. Produced by Sydney choreographic laboratory Critical Path, it focused on issues of identity, ability and intercultural exchange via forums, workshops and dialogue with international artists.

6 December 2017

Interchange Festival: The Start and the End of the Body

Nikki Heywood

Matters of site, proximity, language, alchemical states, excess and ritual constellate around the body in Nikki Heywood’s report on the Interchange festival’s final day of workshops, talks and forums.

6 December 2017

Interchange Festival: The Political Body

Cleo Mees

Cleo Mees reports from Critical Path’s Interchange Festival on The Political Body, a day of intensive discussions, forums, talks and workshops that engage with culture, identity, ability and how to make change through dance.

6 December 2017

JOLT’s musical myth-making

Elyssia Bugg

While appreciating the experimentation and sense of joy that JOLT brings to the field of sound-based performance, Elyssia Bugg is uncertain of the capacity of the ensemble’s new works to fully engage her.

5 December 2017

THE LOOP: Louise Bourgeois on the inside

A superb writer, American visual artist David Salle, responding to a MoMA exhibition, declares Bourgeois’ evocation “of the female body as having an inside might be her greatest legacy”.

5 December 2017

The mutable body: Thomas E S Kelly and Fishhook at PACT

Keith Gallasch

In strikingly expressive productions in PACT’s program of new works from emerging artists, Thomas E S Kelly and Taree Sansbury evoke the drama of shape-shifting in Aboriginal culture and Fishhook face female fears head-on.

5 December 2017

Chauka, Please Tell Us the Time: Detention from the inside

Behrouz Boochani and Aras Kamali Sarvestani’s must-see, darkly revealing 90-minute film, Chauka, Please Tell Us the Time, shot inside the Manus Island detention centre is screening in Sydney and Melbourne next week.

5 December 2017

Pipilotti Rist at the MCA: Serious fantasist

Gail Priest

The retrospective of Swiss media artist Pipilotti Rist at the MCA immerses Gail Priest in magical worlds that merge nature and the everyday where grace and beauty find a home, but what more is there to the Rist vision?

5 December 2017

Conor Bateman: Video essay: Cameraperson to person

Conor Bateman

A highlight of this year’s RealTime video commissions is Conor Bateman’s revelatory account of the way director Kirsten Johnson and her editor structured Cameraperson from decades of footage Johnson shot for leading documentarians.

5 December 2017

Angela Goh, Scum Ballet: Female magic

Keith Gallasch

Angela Goh’s Scum Ballet is a haunting, ritualistic assemblage of strange tasks and images realised with conviction by five performers who build a world of female power and magic, writes Keith Gallasch.

5 December 2017

Editorial 29 November 2017

This week we report on two important festivals that feature spheres of often underrated artistic activity, one drawing together artists from across the country, the other making global connections.

29 November 2017

Report: Hobiennale Arts Festival

Lucy Hawthorne

Hobiennale, a significant gathering of ARIs from across Australia and New Zealand, impresses Lucy Hawthorne with its sharing of works, performances, ideas and its participants’ adaptability to sites in and around Hobart.

29 November 2017

The Daly River Girl: A life examined

Nicky Fearn

Nicky Fearn admires Darwin actress and playwright Tessa Rose’s The Daly River Girl, a solo performance “melding the horror and laughter in the life of a resilient survivor who recounts her stories with wry insight.”

29 November 2017

realtime tv: Hobiennale Arts Festival 2017

Lucy Parakhina provides a visual overview of the Hobiennale Arts Festival, featuring interviews with festival directors Grace Herbert and Liam James, and participants from Brisbane, Sydney and Alice Springs.

28 November 2017

Unsound Adelaide: Local-global soundings

Chris Reid

Chris Reid’s comprehensive account of the Unsound Festival, formerly part of the Adelaide Festival, covers a range of impressive international and local artists and serious thinking about the state of experimental music.

28 November 2017
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