Editorial 22 November 2017

In this week’s RealTime, a multitude of lay and professional performers execute the deeply absorbing A Wave and Waves [image above] in Perth’s Totally Huge New Music Festival, a key event for Australian afficionados of adventurous music-making.

22 November 2017

Wired Open Day Festival’s agri-cultural magic

Neill Overton

Viewing boxes scattered across a paddock conjure a heritage-listed shearing shed and Kenyan elephants loom sonically beneath a starry sky in this year’s Wired Open Day Festival in regional NSW, writes Neill Overton.

21 November 2017

Totally Huge’s sensory & dramatic pleasures

Jonathan W Marshall

DDC’s Glitch maelstrom, A Wave and Waves’ massive ebb and flow and Anne LeBaron’s playful creations deliver sensory and dramatic pleasures for Jonathan W Marshall at this year’s Totally Huge New Music Festival.

21 November 2017

Djurra: Sharing culture; an interview with Kirk Page

Keith Gallasch

Director Kirk Page tells Keith Gallasch about Djurra, a multimedia performance merging the creation story of the Bundjalung nation of north-eastern New South Wales with contemporary reality, a work at once celebratory and emotionally fraught.

21 November 2017

FORM’s Common Anomalies: Dancing with difference

Pauline Manley

In FORM’s Common Anomalies, Pauline Manley encounters a perpetually transforming Bhenji Ra, Imanuel Dado undoing the black and white of making choices, and Carl Sciberras cooking up soup and dance.

21 November 2017

Jackson Davis: The art of videographic performance

Keith Gallasch

Jackson Davis, UOW graduate and a core member of the re:group performance collective reflects on education, the wonders of the internet, influences and works about space travel and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

21 November 2017

Greg McLean’s Jungle, a sensory journey

Katerina Sakkas

Greg McLean’s “willingness to break away from realism into bold expressionistic territory, without ever losing sight of the real humans behind the drama, makes his new film, Jungle, striking,” writes Katerina Sakkas.

21 November 2017

STC’s Three Sisters: seeing double

Keith Gallasch

Keith Gallasch tries to forget Chekhov’s Three Sisters and see the STC adaptation on its own terms, but finds deeply engaging performances denied a supportive conceptual framework.

21 November 2017

Editorial 8 November 2017

This week we offer our third and final set of reviews of the Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art, an invaluable event in a city where independent contemporary performance, live art and dance often seem scattered and sparsely programmed across the year.

8 November 2017

Liveworks: CARRION: Magnificent mutancy

Cleo Mees

Cleo Mees experiences Justin Shoulder’s CARRION as “a dream-space… of fantastical proportions” in which occurs “a profound melding of costume and body, a mutual transformation which produces creatures that feel real, through and through.”

8 November 2017

Putting Liveworks to the test

Keith Gallasch

Keith Gallasch’s overview of a richly engaging 2017 Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art asks how seriously are we to take its “experimental” standing and how it might be openly addressed.

8 November 2017

The Warmun Wreck

Jon Rose

Jon Rose’s wonderfully vivid account of the second in the Wreck Projects in which a retired car in Warmun in the East Kimberley becomes a potent musical instrument reveals the challenges and pleasures of a unique venture.

8 November 2017

Liveworks: Geumhyung Jeong: Actualising fantasies

Nikki Heywood

Geumhyung Jeong’s puppeteering of devices that sexually dominate her in 7 Ways is revealed in Oil Pressure Vibrator to be fundamental to a quest for hermaphroditism in performances of obsessive artistry, writes Nikki Heywood.

8 November 2017

James Hullick: Sound artists just gotta have fun

Keith Gallasch

For Melbourne Music Week, James Hullick, Artistic Director of JOLT, promises “a wild sci-fi sound art/acousmatic/chamber music/pop art experience” with hard-core philosophical enquiry framed by humour.

8 November 2017

Audiovision 28: Post-politics & totalitarian tonality

Philip Brophy

Philip Brophy queries the veracity of Ugis Olte and Morten Traavik’s Liberation Day, a documentary about Slovenian industrial music collective Laibach’s 2015 concert in North Korea.

8 November 2017

Grace Under Pressure: a call for mutual caring

Keith Gallasch

David Williams and Paul Dwyer’s Grace Under Pressure is sensitively crafted verbatim theatre rich with the observations of those who are responsible for us in hospitals and whose own lives are subject to often inordinate pressures, writes Keith Gallasch.

7 November 2017

Giveaway: Una DVD

Australian theatre director Benedict Andrews’ feature film debut is a tense, chilling account of a young woman vengefully confronting a former neighbour who sexually abused her when she was a child. We have 5 DVDs to give away, courtesy of Madman Entertainment.

7 November 2017

The Deep Archive: Being Gena Rowlands

Lesley Stern

In the wake of Nat Randall and Anna Breckon’s success with The Second Woman, it’s time to consider the performance that inspired it, celebrated in a superb article from 1994 about performance and identification by Lesley Stern.

7 November 2017

Editorial 1 November 2017

Performance Space’s Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art proved once again that it can challenge and exhilarate, generate intense debate, and party. This week we look at Eisa Jocson’s Corponomy, LabAnino’s This Here. Land (image above), Tetsuya Umeda’s Ringo, Mark Harvey’s Helping Hand, Lz Dunn’s AEON and Jen Jamieson’s Let’s Make Love.

1 November 2017

Liveworks: Can art make oxytocin?

Teik-Kim Pok

Jen Jamieson’s Let’s Make Love, a one-on-one blend of interactive biochemistry lecture, guided meditation and mini-date designed to raise oxytocin levels, engages and unsettles Teik-Kim Pok.

1 November 2017
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