Editorial 10 October 2018

As a prelude to our five-hour open conversation, RealTime in real time, as part of the Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art, this edition is packed with archival delights.

9 October 2018

Liveworks: RealTime in real time

Unfolding over 5 hours on Sunday 21 October at the Liveworks Festival, RealTime in real time will be an open conversation charting the remarkable transformation of the art experience over the last quarter century and our response to it, as writers, artists and audiences.

9 October 2018

Writers read RealTime

As part of our celebration of the RealTime Archive, we thought you might like to hear the actual voices of our contributors, so we’ve invited them to record readings of reviews of favourite works in Writers read RealTime.

9 October 2018

Living the RealTime life

Kirsten Krauth

Kirsten Krauth vividly recalls her RealTime years 1998-2002, as an evolving writer, Assistant Editor and Editor of the OnScreen supplement, embracing Australian film, hypertext and much more, including a one-off stint as Ivana Caprice, digital porn artist.

9 October 2018

Contributor profile: Fiona McGregor

Fiona McGregor is a Sydney writer and performance artist. The author of five books including Strange Museums, a travel memoir of a performance art tour through Poland, McGregor writes essays, articles and reviews for many publications including RealTime, Overland, The Monthly, The Saturday Paper, Runway and Running Dog.

9 October 2018

A superbly slippery medium: photography in RealTime 2005-2017

Katerina Sakkas

Transformations in documentary photography, the influence of the vernacular shot, photography as history, collaboration and performativity figure in Katerina Sakkas’ survey of incisive, evocative reviewing of images wrought by Pat Brassington, r e a, Christian Thompson, Thomas Demand, Trent Parke, Heidrun Löhr, Robyn Stacey and more in RealTime.

8 October 2018

Contributor Profile: Andrew Fuhrmann

Andrew, who writes about dance, books, theatre, visual art “and who knows what else,” teaches at the VCA and is a researcher at the University of Melbourne, asks “What can I say about myself that can’t already be deduced from the criticism?”

8 October 2018

Edited Highlights: The RealTime years

Greg Hooper

Ranging across 20 years of reviewing for RealTime, Greg Hooper selects his best opening gambits and endings, recalls the art that thrilled and did not, being shy with artists, abhoring unethically loud concerts and challenging taste-offended theorists who see in modernism and its heirs the source of contemporary evil.

8 October 2018

The Best of Tee Off with Vivienne Inch

Vivienne Inch

Embracing a 1997 scheme to eliminate ugliness from public spaces in time for the 2000 Olympics, RealTime columnist Vivienne Inch proposed sport take a good look at itself.

8 October 2018

Welcoming the challenge of the new

Jonathan W Marshall

Jonathan W Marshall probes his reviewing since 1998, focussing on favourite works in theatre and dance (early on in Melbourne in particular), assaying the role of RealTime and reflecting on writing from WA.

8 October 2018

The Best of Tooth and Claw with Jack Rufus

Jack Rufus

Cricket season, late 1997, finds RealTime sports columnist Jack Rufus maddened by a strange linguistic condition afflicting Australian cricket captain Mark “Tubby” Taylor.

8 October 2018

Editorial Monday 10 September 2018

Spring brings promise in the shape of highly focused, inspirational arts festivals of the ilk of Performance Space’s Liveworks Festival of Experimental Art (image above), Adelaide’s OzAsia Festival and the recent Extended Play Festival of Experimental Music in Sydney. South Australia’s artists and audiences, however, are set to endure a wintry slashing of art funding and unified portfolio support.

10 September 2018

Liveworks 2018: It’s Alive! It’s Alive!

Virginia Baxter

Spring for ravenous culture vultures means Liveworks, the annual, two-week feast of seductively challenging live art presented by Sydney’s Performance Space with Asian and Australian artists working side by side.

10 September 2018

Liveworks 2018: Nicola Gunn

As a prelude to Nicola Gunn’s appearance in Performance Space’s Liveworks in Working with Children, we’re linking you to a revealing 2015 interview-based article by Susan Becker on the performer’s vision and creative habits and also to Gail Priest’s fascinating 2014 RealTime TV interview with Gunn.

8 September 2018

OzAsia 2018: mutualism & displacement; interview, Joseph Mitchell

Keith Gallasch

Joseph Mitchell’s enticing program features striking works by female Asian visual artists, a Chinese performance about young women living in a social media bubble, theatre from Iran, Syria and Malaysia, dance from Japan and Indonesia, and South Australian-Asian collaborations.

8 September 2018

Great Extended Play: now for the long play!

Keith Gallasch

A new midday to midnight festival of experimental music filled every space of City Recital Hall, rewarding the curious and the committed with superb performances from ELISION, Ensemble Offspring, Lisa Moore, Bang on a Can All-Stars and many more artists. Exactly the kind of event new music needs more of in the long-term in Sydney.

8 September 2018

On having no style

Linda Marie Walker

While reflecting on writing for RealTime, Linda Marie Walker had been commissioned by a magazine to write about a visual art exhibition. The magazine’s rejection of her piece threw up for the writer questions around house style, poetic language, the general reader and writing as a way of being in the world.

8 September 2018

Authenticity: heritage and avant-garde

As a companion piece to our review of Vicki Van Hout’s plenty serious TALK TALK, we’re re-publishing the artist’s insightful 2012 essay on the challenges faced by an artist of Wiradjuri heritage when making use of dance steps from other Australian Indigenous peoples in experimental hybrid dance works.

8 September 2018

Vicki Van Hout, dancing on a cultural knife-edge

Keith Gallasch

Vicki Van Hout’s new dance theatre work for FORM Dance Projects, plenty serious TALK TALK, is wickedly funny, existentially intimate, culturally complex, bitingly political and superbly danced beneath an exquisite grass sculpture woven by the artist.

8 September 2018

Liveworks: Return to Escape from Woomera                  

In 2003 Migration Minister Phillip Ruddock was furious with the Australia Council for funding the video game Escape from Woomera. In anticipation of Applespiel’s revival of the work as a live gaming and performance experience, we’re linking you to Melanie Swalwell’s fine account of the saga in our archive.

8 September 2018
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