Editorial 28 June 2017

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28 June 2017

City of Ladies: uneasy utopias

Sarinah Masukor

Sarinah Masukor observes conflicting visions of feminist struggle unfold randomly by algorithm in a singular new video work, The City of Ladies, inspired by a utopian medieval text.

28 June 2017

From archive into the future

Lauren Carroll Harris

A retrospective of Sydney feminist cinema at the Sydney Film Festival points not just to a hidden archive of experimental and innovative women’s filmmaking, but a potential future for Australian cinema, writes an inspired Lauren Carroll Harris.

28 June 2017

The Last Goldfish: putting the pieces back together

Virginia Baxter

Su Goldfish’s documentary premiering at the Sydney Film Festival reveals the maker’s sheer investigative and creative determination to uncover her father’s elusive past, writes Virginia Baxter.

28 June 2017

Sydney Film Festival’s engaging outliers

Katerina Sakkas

Katerina Sakkas’ search for non-mainstream, experimental and eerie features in the 2017 festival program is rewarded with idiosyncratic works by Thai, Afghan and New Zealand filmmakers.

28 June 2017

Not so fictional Cleverman

Tyson Yunkaporta

The first two episodes of Cleverman season two reveal a deepening of the show’s themes of biological genocide and real-life Indigenous apocalypse, trickled through the superhero genre, writes Tyson Yunkaporta.

28 June 2017

Interview: Mark Howett, Good Little Soldier

Keith Gallasch

Perth’s Ochre Contemporary Dance Company presents Artistic Director Mark Howett’s Good Little Soldier, a personally-driven account of the effect of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on soldiers and their families.

28 June 2017

The Second Woman: the female star as agent

Briony Kidd

At Dark Mofo, Briony Kidd applauds Nat Randall’s 24-hour performance, the Second Woman, for its rigorous onstage evocation of filmmaking, skilful engagement with volunteer male participants and its insightful feminist vision.

28 June 2017

Wireless: fear of phones

Kathryn Kelly

In Wireless, choreographer Lisa Wilson and composer Paul Charlier boldly reveal how “the joyous freedom of handheld technology has been replaced by a monolithic and disturbing entrapment,” writes Kathryn Kelly.

27 June 2017

Intellectuality, the sociable scent

Briony Kidd

With a scent Dark Mofo artist Isabel Lewis prompts her audience to consider the ways we sense and think in what Briony Kidd experiences as a synthesis of artist talk, performance, installation and social gathering.

27 June 2017

The people remember, the city listens

Ann Deslandes

Ann Deslandes reports from Mexico City on innovative artists’ nurturing of collective memory and political reflection via the public gathering of sounds and music on digital platforms.

27 June 2017

Philipa Rothfield: Tokyo, Japan

RealTime Traveller

In an ideal introduction to this remarkable city, Philipa Rothfield describes Tokyo as “a sensory vortex, a perceptual oasis in the rush of my own life.”

27 June 2017

Inside the real/digital warp

Laetitia Wilson

Fremantle Arts Centre and Revelation Film Festival present eight Australian video art works that suggest, writes Laetitia Wilson, we are living out the aftermath of digital disruption.

27 June 2017

After Julia: gift for an ex-pm

Keith Gallasch

Featuring commissioned works from seven Australian female composers, Decibel’s warm, witty and politically incisive new music tribute to Julia Gillard plays at Brisbane’s Metro Arts on 13 and 14 July and Monash University on 20 July.

27 June 2017

Editorial 21 June 2017

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21 June 2017

An anxious Australia

Lauren Carroll Harris

In Antidote’s Moving Nations, young visual artists present highly personalised critiques of Australia’s history of migration, writes Lauren Carroll Harris.

21 June 2017

Black Honey Company: bear lives that matter

Teik-Kim Pok

In a “fairytale for the hip hop generation,” writes Teik-Kim Pok, Candy Bowers and Nancy Denis of the Black Honey Company play threatened bears in a wickedly funny tale of cultural appropriation.

21 June 2017

Night Parrot Stories: myth vs reality

Luke Goodsell

Night Parrot Stories, an overlooked essay film on the search for a possibly extinct desert bird, “joins the chorus for the resurrection of endangered mythologies,” writes Luke Goodsell.

21 June 2017

Action Hero: on a mission

John Bailey

John Bailey sees British performance group Action Hero at Arts House fall prey to the delights of the American high school sports movie in Hoke’s Bluff and grippingly transcend the clichés of the celebrity photoshoot in Wrecking Ball.

20 June 2017

Emily Dickinson: her soul is her own

Joanna Di Mattia

“While Dickinson’s life appears on the surface to be a quiet one, Terence Davies interprets it as emotionally brutal,” writes Joanna Di Mattia of A Quiet Passion, showing in cinemas now.

20 June 2017
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